Blog Post

Yr 3 Typography

For my year 3 typography module we are required to take one story from one episode of short cuts, a program on the BBC that was nominated for the best speech program at the Radio Academy Awards in 2014, transform it into an experimental form of typography. We need to visually represent the words or use words as the typographic starting point, or the ideas the story present in a way that captivate and engages the reader or user.

We need to find a way to capture the spirit of the message and how it can be represented in an intelligent and experimental way. Stories can have several thousand words, we I able to edit and amend the text in a meaningful way that doesn't stray from the purpose of the original piece. The brief the brief says" as a final year student who should seek the outer reaches of typographic expression and draw on your knowledge and interests. How for instance might your story be meaningfully deployed across a range of new objects or locations. The output, reason for its existence, it's for you to decide. Specs karma you need to be an editor, storyteller and designer all-in-one. Capture the story." For this module I want to do something that uses the senses. For example touch, you can feel letters as much as you can see them, the human finger is able to pick up many molecules that the eye may not see. For example if a grain of salt was left on a table, your finger would most definitely feel it. However, as I have not yet listened to any of the shortcuts episodes, I am unable to decide or research my context or design that I wish to follow. But with the senses idea I feel it would be most suited for a episode about the visually impaired. Another idea I had what's to create a scale replica of a garden that used typography as a main feature, but again this would be for a specific topic such as gardening, landscaping or even building.

  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Pinterest Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

Email me:  burtenshawgraphics@gmail.com

© 2017 by Morgan Burtenshaw.